Crisis Decade (1850 – 1860)

…“Queen Sugar” reigned supreme in Brooklyn. The sugar industry, so crucial to Brooklyn’s growth, exploited land and labor from the southern slave plantations of Louisiana to the cane fields of Cuba. Atlantic Docks and Basin. ca. 1870. Brooklyn photograph and illustration collection. V1973.5.856. Brooklyn Historical Society. Teacher’s Manual Section 4: Lesson 13 Brooklyn – the “walled city.” By 1840, Manhattan’s waterfront warehouses had become ov…

Abolitionist Biographies

…orth Carolina-born Junius Morel moved to Brooklyn from Philadelphia where became a journalist, lecturer, political activist, and prominent citizen of Weeksville. For more than 30 years, he served as principal of the black school there, called Colored School No. 2. A prolific writer, Morel reported for The North Star, The Christian Recorder and other local and national abolitionist journals. He was a key Brooklyn member of the Committee of Thirtee…

US Department of Education Resources

…oklyn to honor the anti-slavery movement in Brooklyn; walking tours of Brooklyn’s abolitionists’ and URR sites; and a series of public programs scheduled for the next five years. Legacy of Slavery in Maryland preserves and promotes experiences that have shaped the lives of Maryland’s African American population. From the day that Mathias de Sousa and Francisco landed in St. Mary’s County aboard the Ark and the Dove in 1634, black Mary…

Timeline

…political protests, and temperance meetings. They church also assisted with fugitives or freedom seekers newly arrived in the city. 1827 Long Island Niger, Brooklyn Boblashun! Hurore for Jackson, 1829. SY1829 no. 39.Collection of The New-York Historical Society. Teacher’s Manual Section 1: Lesson 6 On July 4, 1827 slavery ended in New York State. Black New Yorkers chose to celebrate the next day in order to avoid reprisals and comment on the par…

A Gradual Emancipation (1783 – 1827)

…political protests, and temperance meetings. They church also assisted with fugitives or freedom seekers newly arrived in the city. Long Island Niger, Brooklyn Boblashun! Hurore for Jackson, 1829. SY1829 no. 39.Collection of The New-York Historical Society. Teacher’s Manual Section 1: Lesson 6 On July 4, 1827 slavery ended in New York State. Black New Yorkers chose to celebrate the next day in order to avoid reprisals and comment on the paradox…

Civil War & Beyond (1861 – 1867)

…fe. Female abolitionists in Brooklyn and beyond ran mutual-aid, anti-slavery, and literary societies to improve their local communities. In particular, black women across Brooklyn and New York worked to fund Manhattan’s Colored Orphan Asylum. Founded in 1835 by Anna Shotwell and Mary Murray, two white Quaker women, the Colored Orphan Asylum provided an essential service in antebellum New York. For African Americans living in poverty, the Asylum o…

Games

…o. Sugar Refinery Havemeyer,Townsend & Co. Sugar Refinery opened on the Williamsburg Waterfront in 1856. Sugar was the largest luxury commodity to emerge from Brooklyn that relied on the labor of enslaved people. Freeman Murrows Freeman Murrows, an inventor, secured a patent for his “adjustable brush” for whitewashing and painting varnish in 1854. He is one of Brooklyn’s many African- American business owners that had to overcome many social,…